Category Archives: Latest

314 – ADOPT goes online

ADOPT is the Adoption and Diffusion Outcome Prediction Tool. It is now available as an online version, replacing the spreadsheet that has over 1000 users.

I’ve previous talked about how agricultural scientists, extension agents, policy makers and suppliers need to be able to predict how farmers will respond to a new practice or technology (PD203). How many farmers will adopt the new practice, and how quickly will they do so? This knowledge can influence research priorities, reserach funding decisions, the design and emphasis of extension campaigns, and the effectiveness of agricultural policies.

Although there is any amount of research exploring factors that influenced past adoption of novel practices by farmers, there has been very little effort to convert all that knowledge into a prediction tool.

A team of us developed ADOPT to fill that gap. There have been over 1000 downloads of the spreadsheet tool we developed, which comes in two versions: for developed and developing countries.

Now we have released an online version that superscedes the spreadsheet version for developed countries (we’re still working on the developing-country online version). It has a number of new features that make it even more useful and informative.

If you’d like a to investigate it, head over to adopt.csiro.au. You’ll need to create an account, and then you can explore the tool for free.

There is also an option to register for a full license, costing A$49, which gives you access to more results, a project report, and an unlimited number of assessments for one year.

Meanwhile, our journal paper about ADOPT in Agricultural Systems continues to be in their top 10 most downloaded papers (as of 9 June 2018). There have been around 10,000 downloads of the paper since it went online in late 2017. Feel free to get one yourself – it’s free and doesn’t require a subscription.

Further reading

Kuehne, G., Llewellyn, R., Pannell, D.J., Wilkinson, R., Dolling, P., Ouzman, J. and Ewing, M. (2017). Predicting farmer uptake of new agricultural practices: a tool for research, extension and policy, Agricultural Systems 156, 115-125. Journal web page * Ideas page

312 – The economics of nitrogen in agriculture

The global challenge of feeding seven billion people would be more difficult without nitrogen fertilizer, but it causes pollution of rivers, lakes and coastal waters around the world, and it contributes to emissions of greenhouse gases. It increases the profitability of individual farmers, but it is over-applied in many cases, wasting money and needlessly worsening environmental problems.

These are, in large part, economic issues. In a recent paper I attempted to summarise the large and diverse research literatures on the economics of nitrogen in agriculture. Here are some of the key points.

At the farm level

The production function for nitrogen (N) fertilizer (the relationship between yield and the rate of nitrogen fertilizer) always exhibits diminishing marginal returns – it flattens out at higher fertilizer rates. In dry conditions, yield may even fall at high N rates.

The rate of nitrogen fertilizer that maximises expected profit is less than the rate that maximises expected yield, sometimes much less.

Here’s a really neat tool that shows the relationships between N, yield and profit for corn in the US. http://cnrc.agron.iastate.edu/

Visual effect of nitrogen fertilizer on corn

Risk

N fertilizer affects the riskiness of cropping. For two reasons, higher N rates are more risky (i.e. profits are more variable at higher N rates). One reason is that the grain price is itself risky. Since profit depends on grain price times yield, and yield usually increases with increasing N rate, the more N you apply, the more variable your profit will be. In addition, yield also tends to be slightly more variable at higher N rates.

Flat payoff functions

There always exists a range of fertilizer rates that are only slightly less profitable than the profit-maximising rate (i.e. a range where the payoff function is relatively flat), and in most cases, that flat range is wide. This means that the farmer has flexibility in choosing the fertilizer rate. If a lower rate would better satisfy another objective (e.g. risk reduction), the farmer can choose that rate with little sacrifice of profit. If regulators require a moderate reduction in fertilizer rate below the farmer’s economic optimum, the cost to the farmer will be small. Flat payoff functions also mean that the benefits of precision-agriculture technologies that spatially adjust fertilizer rates within a field will usually be small.

Nitrogen pollution

Typically, the marginal cost to farmers of nitrogen emissions abatement is low for low levels of abatement but increases at an increasing rate as the required level of abatement increases. As a result, modest targets for abatement can often be achieved at low cost, but ambitious targets can be extremely costly.

Spatial targeting of abatement effort (both at the regional and international scales) can generate much larger benefits than untargeted policies, although these additional benefits are likely to be offset to some degree by increased costs required to run a targeted program (costs of information and administration).

Policies intended to increase farmers’ incomes can have the unintended consequence of increasing nitrogen pollution by increasing the incentive to apply fertilizer.

Further reading

Pannell, D.J. (2017). Economic perspectives on nitrogen in farming systems: managing trade-offs between production, risk and the environment, Soil Research 55, 473-478. Journal web page

Gandorfer, M., Pannell, D.J. and Meyer-Aurich, A. (2011). Analyzing the Effects of Risk and Uncertainty on Optimal Tillage and Nitrogen Fertilizer Intensity for field crops in Germany, Agricultural Systems 104(8), 615-622. Journal web page ♦ IDEAS page

Schilizzi, S. and Pannell, D.J. (2001). The economics of nitrogen fixation, Agronomie 21(6/7), 527-538.

Pannell, D.J. and Falconer, D.A. (1988). The relative contributions to profit of fixed and applied nitrogen in a crop‑livestock farm system, Agricultural Systems 26(1), 1‑17. Journal web page ♦ IDEAS page

Pannell, D.J. (2006). Flat-earth economics: The far-reaching consequences of flat payoff functions in economic decision making, Review of Agricultural Economics 28(4), 553-566. Journal web page ♦ IDEAS page

308 – Vote yes for marriage equality

Australians currently have a chance to vote for marriage equality by postal ballot. I know this is a bit off the usual topics for this blog, but it’s something I feel strongly about. If you have the right to vote, here are six reasons to vote yes.

1. Because it’s the kind and decent thing to do. It would create joy for many thousands of people without hurting anybody.

2. Because gay people still face prejudice in many forms, and still attempt suicide at higher rates than their peers. Voting yes would be one small step towards turning this around.

3. Because we should not let the religious beliefs of a minority dictate how the rest of us live our lives. There is and should be a separation of church and state in Australia. Nobody should be required to follow the dictates of a religion to which they do not voluntarily subscribe. That is the real issue of religious freedom here – quite the opposite of what some “no” advocates are claiming.

4. Because the position of some Christians against same-sex marriage is not supported by the Bible anyway (Whitaker, 2017). The Bible has vastly more to say about being kind and generous than the few vague fragments it includes on homosexuality. Nowhere does it actually proscribe same-sex marriage. In the Old Testament, it does say that a man lying with another man instead of his wife is an “abomination”. But (a) this is about adulterous sex, not marriage between a loving couple, and (b) there is an interesting list of other things that the Old Testament also describes as abominations, including wearing mixed-fabric clothing, tattoos, mocking the blind by putting obstacles in their way, and trimming your beard. Why are we not having a postal plebiscite on the trimming of beards? The highly selective focus of some Christians on homosexuality is hypocritical. Neither testament of the Bible says anything whatsoever against lesbians.

5. Because Australia is lagging behind the rest of the civilised world. Same-sex marriage is already legal in The Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Canada, South Africa, Norway, Sweden, Portugal, Iceland, Argentina, Denmark, France, Brazil, Uruguay, New Zealand, the UK, Ireland, the US, Luxemburg, Colombia, Greenland, Finland, Slovenia, Germany and Taiwan.

6. Because this change is inevitable, and saying no now would needlessly delay us doing the right thing. It prolongs the debate and increases the number of public expressions of anti-gay prejudices.

Post your completed survey form back by 31 October to be sure of meeting the deadline.

Further reading

Whitaker, R.J. (2017). Same-sex marriage: What does the Bible really have to say? Here

307 – John Kerin’s memoirs

John Kerin was Minister for Primary Industries in the Australian Government between 1983 and 1991. His memoirs are now available as a free download. Having seen him speak several times since he ceased being a minister, I think his memoirs should be fascinating and very informative. Agriculture was very lucky to have him as minister during this period of great change and disruption. 

John Kerin was unusual as a minister in that he knew a lot about the issues he was responsible for. Not only was he experienced as an agricultural producer, but he was also trained as an agricultural economist, and worked for a while in the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

Apparently, his expertise was not always appreciated by his department. In the last part of the book he says “the ethos of some government departments was that they preferred ministers who knew nothing – the better to manage or control them. However, I thought that it was not necessarily an impediment to know something about your portfolio areas. The constant rotation of ministers is not good for policy making.”

Not only did he know a lot, he was clearly very thoughtful and remarkably frank. “Nor … do I want to give the impression that I was always sure about what I was doing, what the outcome of some policy options may be or where the changes and reforms we were introducing may lead. … By nature I am a pessimist, slow to come to decisions and generally believe that I am wrong until convinced of the path to take.”

A landmark event during his term as minister was the wool crisis. His eventual decisions for the industry were critically important and rather heroic as they faced fierce opposition from the whole industry, which seemed determined to do itself almost unlimited damage.

Some of his perspectives are all too relevant in our current political climate. “I have always been terrified by people in politics who are absolutely sure they are right, have God on their side or tell me they are ‘men of principle’. Such people seem able to blind themselves to their own hypocrisy and humbuggery – and are dangerous.”

I’m really looking forward to reading the book.

Further reading

Kerin, J.C. (2017). The Way I Saw It; The Way It Was: The Making of National Agricultural and Natural Resource Management Policy, Analysis and Policy Observatory, Melbourne. Available here: http://apo.org.au/node/76216

Pannell, D. (2014). Supply and demand: the wool crisis, Pannell Discussions no. 266.

306 – Economics of green infrastructure in cities: some essentials

During the recent Conference of the CRC for Water Sensitive Cities in Perth, I was interviewed about some of the essential points that non-economists need to be aware of when thinking about the economics of water-related investments in cities. The video is now available.

My team has been part of the CRC since it started back in 2012. In the interview I talk a bit about the work we’ve already done and what we’re doing now, and then identify my three top tips for non-economists: that benefits from an investment relate to the differences in outcomes with versus without the investment (not before versus after); that the timing of benefits and costs can matter greatly to the economic results; and that you need to account to a range of risks that might cause any particular investment to deliver less than you’d hoped.

These issues are spelt out more in the video (13:50 long), which you can see right here.

Further reading

Pannell, D.J. (2015). Ranking projects for water sensitive cities – a practical guide, CRC for Water Sensitive Cities: here

Web site for our CRC project: here