Category Archives: Environment

319 – Reducing water pollution from agricultural fertilizers

I gave a talk to the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) on July 16, 2019, exploring ways to reduce water pollution from agricultural fertilizers.

Many methods have been proposed to reduce water pollution from agricultural fertilizers. The list includes use of nitrification inhibitors, land retirement, vegetation buffer strips along waterways, flood-plain restoration, constructed wetlands, bioreactors, cover crops, zero till and getting farmers to reduce their fertilizer application rates.

Last year, while I was at the University of Minnesota for several months, I reviewed the literature on these options and came to the conclusion that the option with the best prospects for success is reducing fertilizer application rates. It’s the only one of these options that is likely to be both effective and cheap.

In my talk, I made the case for agencies who are trying to reduce pollution to focus on reducing fertilizer rates.

In brief, I identified three key reasons why there are untapped opportunities to reduce fertilizer rates.

1. Some farmers apply more fertilizer than is in their own best interests. Surveys in the US suggest that something like 20 to 30% of American farmers could make more profit if they reduced their rates. If it was possible to identify these farmers and convince them of this, it would be a rare win-win for farmers and the environment.

2. Even those farmers who currently apply fertilizer close to the rates that would maximize their profits could cut their rates without sacrificing much profit. Within the region of the economically optimal rate, the relationship between fertilizer rate and profit is remarkably flat. New estimates by Yaun Chai (University of Minnesota) of this relationship for corn after corn in Iowa indicate that farmers could cut their rates by 30% below the profit-maximizing rate and only lose 5% of their profits from that crop. For corn after soybeans, the equivalent opportunity is for a 45% cut!

3. Some farmers believe that applying an extra-high rate of fertilizer provides them with a level of insurance. They think it reduces their risk of getting a low yield. However, the empirical evidence indicates exactly the opposite. When you weigh up the chances of an above-average yield and a below-average yield, higher fertilizer rates are actually more risky than lower rates. In addition, price risk interacts with yield risk to further increase the riskiness of high rates.

I think there is a real opportunity to explore these three factors in more depth and try to come up with policy approaches that could deliver reduced fertilizer usage in a highly cost-effective way. Some of it would just be about effective communication (e.g. the design of “nudges”, as popularised in behavioural economics) while some might require a modest financial commitment from government or industry. One idea is to offer something like a money-back guarantee to those farmers who agree to reduce their rates by a specified amount. If they lose money as a result, they get compensation. Because of the flatness of the fertilizer-profit relationship, the payments required would usually be very small.

I recorded the presentation to OMAFRA, and it’s available here.

Further reading

Pannell, D.J. (2006). Flat-earth economics: The far-reaching consequences of flat payoff functions in economic decision making, Review of Agricultural Economics 28(4), 553-566. Journal web page * Prepublication version here (44K). * IDEAS page

Pannell, D.J. (2017). Economic perspectives on nitrogen in farming systems: managing trade-offs between production, risk and the environment, Soil Research 55, 473-478. Journal web page

318 – Measuring impacts from environmental research

There have been some studies considering the relationship between research and environmental policy but studies capturing the impact of research on environmental management, environmental policy, and environmental outcomes are relatively rare. Here is one attempt.

Environmental research may generate benefits in a variety of ways including by providing: information or technology that allows improved management of an environmental issue; information that fosters improved decision-making about priorities for environmental management or policy; or information about an environmental issue that is of intrinsic interest to the community. There are several reasons why it can be worth measuring the impacts of environmental research, including making a case for the funding of environmental research, informing decisions about research priorities, and helping researchers to make decisions about their research that increase its ultimate benefits.

Earlier this year we released the results of an assessment of the engagement and impacts of a particular environmental research centre, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). The assessment includes impacts on policy, management and the community, as well as measures of academic performance, including publications, citations and collaborations. Data were collected in several ways: a survey of all project leaders for the Centre’s 87 projects, the preparation of detailed case studies for selected projects, and collection of statistics on publications, citations and collaborations.

The approach taken was informed by a recent paper of ours called “Policy-oriented environmental research: What is it worth?” (Pannell et al. 2018). The full report is available here.

The Centre’s engagement with end users and stakeholders was strong in Australia and around the world. Researchers reported many examples of engagement with research users involved in policy and management. Results were highly heterogeneous and somewhat skewed, with the majority of observed impact occurring in a minority of the projects.

For almost half of the projects, the potential future increase in impact was assessed as being moderate or high. To some extent, this reflects the time lags involved in research attempting to influence policy and management, but the information was also used to identify projects for which additional engagement effort could be beneficial. The correlation between impact and academic performance was positive but low.

To obtain richer detail about impacts, detailed case studies were prepared for nine research projects. The projects were selected to be diverse, rather than representative. These case studies highlight the unique circumstances faced by each project in endeavouring to have an impact. Each project must be framed within a strong understanding its domain and be deeply engaged with research users if impact is to occur. Substantial benefits for policy or management are apparent in a number of the case studies.

A factor contributing greatly to the impact of CEED was the research communication magazine Decision Point. This publication was widely accepted as a valued communication resource for academic findings in the field of environmental decision sciences, and was rated by people in government and academic institutions as relevant and informative.

Some valuable lessons and implications of the impact analysis are identified in the report. Research impact does not depend only on good relationships, engagement and communication, but also importantly on what research is done. Therefore, embedding a research culture that values impact and considers how it may be achieved before the selection of research projects is potentially important. The role of the Centre leadership team in this is critical. Embedding impact into the culture of a centre likely occurs more effectively if expertise in project evaluation is available internally, either through training or appointments.

A challenge in conducting this analysis was obtaining information related to engagement and impact. There may be merit in institutionalising the collection of impact-related data from early in the life of a new research centre.

Interestingly, we found little relationship between (a) impact from translation and engagement and (b) measures of academic merit. It should not be presumed that the most impactful projects will be those of greatest academic performance.

At the time of the assessment, CEED had generated 848 publications which had been cited 14,996 times according to the Web of Science. CEED publications are disproportionately among the most cited papers in their disciplines. More than a quarter of CEED publications are in the top 10% of the literature, based on their citations. For 39 CEED publications (one in 22), their citations place them in the top 1% of their academic fields in the past 10 years.

There are often long lags between the start of research and delivering the impact — decades in many cases. Therefore, there is a need to allow the longest possible time lag when assessing research impact. On shorter timescales, it may be possible to detect engagement, but not the full impact that will eventually result.

Further reading

Pannell, D.J., Alston, J.M., Jeffrey, S., Buckley, Y.M., Vesk, P., Rhode, J.R., McDonald-Madden, E., Nally, S., Gouche, G. and Thamo, T. (2018). Policy-oriented environmental research: What is it worth? Environmental Science and Policy 86, 64-71. Journal web page

Thamo, T., Harold, T., Polyakov, M. and Pannell, D. (2018). Assessment of Engagement and Impact for the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, CEED, University of Queensland. http://ceed.edu.au/resources/impact-report.html

317 – The worth of wildlife

What is a threatened species worth? It may seem like a strange question, but it’s one that environmental economists have done a fair bit of research on.

If you measured their worth in commercial terms, the answer would be, probably nothing in most cases. But most of us care about threatened species and would be willing to pay something to prevent them from going extinct. There have been many studies conducted by environmental economists to estimate just how much people are willing to pay to protect particular threatened species. PhD student Vandana Subroy is lead author on a new study in the journal Ecological Economics where we conducted a “meta-analysis” – a review of 109 willingness-to-pay estimates from 47 studies around the world.

We found that the average willingness to pay to protect a species was US$414 per household (once off, not per year). Over a large population, this adds up to very large budgets being justified – vastly larger than the current budget for threatened species recovery in Australia.

Of course, the range across different species in different studies in different countries was enormous: as low as US$1 per household and as high as US$4,400.

Photo: J.J. Harrison (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Not surprisingly, people’s willingness to pay was much higher for “charismatic” species. Determining which species are “charismatic” is clearly subjective, but it’s safe to say they are typically large vertebrates that instinctively appeal to humans (e.g., elephants, pandas, and whales). In our study, species were treated as charismatic if they had been characterized as such in the original study, or elsewhere. The average willingness to pay was US$572 for charismatic species compared with US$106 for non-charismatic species.

Surprisingly the difference in willingness to pay between developed and developing countries was small, and not statistically significant.

One of the most surprising things we learned from doing the study was just how poorly done many of the studies were. In many cases, it was not at all clear in the question that was asked of survey respondents what was being valued. An amazing number of surveys were not clear about the base case – e.g. if there was no new intervention, what would be the probability of extinction of the species? Without that, you can’t give a meaningful willingness-to-pay response. Many surveys asked vaguely about “protecting” the species, but without saying what it was being protected from, or how protected it would be. Because of these and other weaknesses, we had to leave a lot of studies out of the meta-analysis. I commented to my colleagues that I wanted to cancel the economics degrees of the people who did these studies (assuming they had economics degrees).

If you’re interested, the paper can be downloaded for free even without a subscription, until August 30, 2019: here.

Further reading

Subroy, V., Gunawardena, A., Polyakov, M., Pandit, R. and Pannell, D.J. (2019). The worth of wildlife: A meta-analysis of global non-market values of threatened species, Ecological Economics (forthcoming). Journal web page

316 – Resources for agri-environmental schemes

I’ve been asked to present a talk in Ireland in two weeks, on the topic “The Design of Effective Agri-Environment Schemes”. In putting the talk together, it struck me that I (with help from colleagues) have developed quite a few resources in this space, so I’ve collected them on a new web site to make them easily accessible.

Agri-environmental schemes (or programs or policies) aim to reduce the adverse impacts of agriculture on the environment. There are many such schemes around the world, but often they are not very efficient or effective. We could often do a lot better if we did a smarter job of designing and implementing these schemes.

Not that it’s easy. There are so many aspects to consider: the effectiveness of different practices at reducing environmental damage, their attractiveness (or otherwise) to farmers, the mechanisms to be used to promote the best practices, the costs and risks of different approaches, which environmental issues are the priorities, and so on. In my view, most designers of agri-environmental schemes don’t appreciate what a difficult task they are trying to do, and make do with relatively quick and dirty approaches to the design.

The resources I’ve included on the web site address a wide range of relevant issues, including:

  • Lessons from past agri-environmental schemes
  • The selection of appropriate policy mechanisms
  • Measuring environmental values
  • Ranking projects, including the choice of an appropriate metric
  • Additionality
  • Understanding and predicting farmers’ adoption of new practices
  • Dealing with uncertainty and including systems for learning from experience
  • The need to pull off that together in a coherent framework

It includes journal articles, books, reports, frameworks, computer tools, web sites, and blog posts, plus links to my free online course on “Agriculture, Economics and Nature”.

Overall, if an organisation wanted to design and deliver an agri-environmental scheme that would really deliver outcomes, they could benefit greatly from the material on this site. The URL is www.resources4aes.net.

Further reading

Pannell, D.J. (2008). Public benefits, private benefits, and policy intervention for land-use change for environmental benefits, Land Economics 84(2): 225-240. Full paper (140K) * IDEAS page

315 – Shark conservation and demand for tourism in the Maldives

As I’ve noted previously, diving with wild sharks is a growing tourism industry. It has the potential to increase the demand for shark conservation, in order to maintain the economic benefits to tourism operators, and the benefits to tourists. Here we quantify these benefits in the Maldives, as well as the cost of worsening conservation.

The Republic of the Maldives is a small island nation in the central Indian Ocean. The country is composed of about 1200 islands of which 200 are inhabited, around 122 are assigned as resort islands, and the remainder are uninhabited.

Tourism dominates the nation’s economy, accounting for 27% of the gross domestic product in 2014. Diving and snorkelling are the most popular activities of tourists.

In 2010, a shark sanctuary was implemented in the Maldives when the declining status of shark fisheries and concerns over decreased shark sightings from divers encouraged the government to announce a total ban on shark fisheries in its waters. Today, shark populations are recovering in most, but not all, atolls.

However, the new regime is not without challenges. One is the ability of the government to actively enforce the ban on shark fishing. Another is the fact that it is still legal to sell shark jaws and teeth in tourist shops, creating an incentive for illegal fishing. Reef fishermen don’t like sharks eating their potential catch, and have been observed killing them.

On the other hand, conserving sharks is in the interests of dive operators and resorts.  Some resorts report illegal fishing activities to authorities and refuse to buy fish from fishermen that have landed sharks.

Led by PhD student, Johanna Zimmerhackel, we  investigated the link between shark conservation actions and economic returns from diving tourism. A survey-based approach (travel cost combined with contingent behaviour) was used to estimate the dive trip demand under different management scenarios.

Our results show that increasing shark populations could increase dive-trip demand by 15%, raising dive tourists’ welfare by US$58 million annually. This could result in annual economic benefits for the dive-tourism industry of more than US$6 million.

Conversely, in scenarios where shark populations decline from their current levels, where dive tourists observe illegal fishing, or if dive operators lack engagement in shark conservation, dive trip demand could decrease by up to 56%. This decline causes economic losses of more than US$24 million annually to the dive tourism industry.

These results highlight the dependence of the shark-diving industry on the creation and enforcement of appropriate management regimes for shark conservation. These results are important given the shameful over-exploitation of sharks in many parts of the world, particularly to satisfy the pointless demand for shark fins (flavourless cartilage) for shark-fin soup in Asia.

Further reading

Zimmerhackel, J.S., Rogers, A.A., Meekan, M.G., Ali, K., Pannell, D.J. and Kragt, M.E. (2018). How shark conservation in the Maldives affects demand for dive tourism, Tourism Management 69, 263-271. Journal web page  NOTE: The journal article can be downloaded for free, without subscription, until August 15.

Zimmerhackel, Johanna S & Pannell, David J & Meekan, Mark & Kragt, Marit E & Rogers, Abbie, (2016). Diving Tourism and Fisheries in Marine Protected Areas: Market Values and New Approaches to Improve Compliance in the Maldives Shark Sanctuary, Working Papers 243921, University of Western Australia, School of Agricultural and Resource Economics. IDEAS page